Jane Addams's Essays and Speeches on Peace by Jane Addams.

Jane Addams's essays and speeches on peace. (Jane Addams; Marilyn Fischer; Judy D Whipps) Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat. Find items in libraries near you. Advanced Search Find a Library. COVID-19 Resources. Reliable information.

Jane Addams's Essays and Speeches on Peace book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The pragmatist philosopher Jane Addams (1860-19.

Jane Addams's Essays and Speeches on Peace. - Free Online.

The pragmatist philosopher Jane Addams (1860-1935) is celebrated as the founder of Hull House, the settlement house for disadvantaged people in Chicago, where for many years she put into practice her progressive ideas for social reform. Addams was also deeply involved in international peace efforts. Remaining a pacifist throughout World War I, she was a founder of the Women's International.The Swarthmore College Peace Collection is the official repository for these papers. Creator Addams, Jane (1860-1935) Title Jane Addams Collection Inclusive Dates 1838-date Call Number DG 001 Language of Materials Materials in English Extent 130 linear feet (papers only) Abstract.This volume contains the most complete collection ever made of Addams's essays, articles, and speeches on peace and international relations, written between 1899 and 1935.


Jane Addams supported most of this house from her own pocket. However, she got help from many volunteers, who wanted to help the poor as Jane had done. “By the end of the year twenty volunteers lived at Hull House, and others reported in on a weekly basis” (Kittredge 48). Hull House offered much to the poor people of Chicago. It had nursery schools, kindergartens, club meetings, craft.Because of the peaceful movement efforts, Jane Addams was received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931. She was applauded because she was the primary woman in the world to win the prize and for her belief of the need to establish American democracy. After receiving the award, Jane shared her prize money with the other women to assist in covering some of the expenses and facilitate the movement’s.

Jane Adams Theories of Feminism Jane Addams was born on 6th of September 1860 and lived till the 21st of May 1935. She was not just a great feminist but also a social worker, who founded Hull House in Chicago (Murrin, Johnson and McPerpherson, 2008). She is also a renowned sociologist, a public philosopher and a leader who worked for peace of the world and strength of women. Apart from.

Read More

In honoring Jane Addams, we also pay tribute to the work which women can do for peace and fraternity among nations. The old concept implied that woman was the source of nearly all sin and strife on earth. Popular tradition and poetry would also have it that women were frequently the cause of the wars waged by kings and nations. I know of only one legend to the contrary, the story of the Sabine.

Read More

The Selected Papers of Jane Addams, Volumes 4-6. Volumes 4-6 will be edited by Cathy Moran Hajo and the staff of the Jane Addams Papers at Ramapo College. Volume 4: 1901-1913. Volume 4 will document Addams’ leadership of movements for child labor and child protective services, and her work to improve the environments for working class and immigrant people. Working from her base at Hull-House.

Read More

Essays and criticism on Jane Addams - Critical Essays. Jane Addams 1860-1935 American social worker, essayist and autobiographer.

Read More

Free 2-day shipping. Buy Jane Addams's Essays and Speeches on Peace (Paperback) at Walmart.com.

Read More

Rhetoric Essay Jane Addams’ speech explains her stance of George Washington's legacy as a soldier, statesman, and a Virginia planter. In this speech, Jane Addams references George Washington’s accomplishments in his past, including how things would be if he is to be present today. The most significant uses of rhetorical devices in this speech include hypophora, rhetorical questions.

Read More

As the Peace Party’s representative, Addams attended the International Congress of Women at the Hague and was selected to serve as head of the commission to find an end to the war. At the same time, in a series of three books Addams outlined her thoughts concerning peace and peace building. In “Newer Ideal of Peace,” published in 1909, Addams argued for the need of basic social reform.

Read More

Addams also participated in finding the National Association for the Advancement of colored People. This was recognized as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. In 1931, Jane Addams was awarded the Nobel Peace prize for all her achievements. Addams’ achievements represent a.

Read More

Jane Addams, coming from a wealthy, politically active family, personified all the ideals of the Progressive Era by working with social reform movements such as the settlement house movement, workers’ rights, children’s rights, civil rights, and women’s suffrage and constantly trying to make life better for those less fortunate than herself.

Read More

Although Jane Addams's essays and books on peace are frequently cited, they have long been out of print and hard to find. For the first time, three of her books—Newer Ideals of Peace (1906), Women at the Hague: The International Congress of Women and Its Results (1915), and Peace and Bread in Time of War (1922)—have been reset and gathered together in this collection, along with a volume.

Read More